BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Zinc and maternal-infant brain function in southern Ethiopia: RCTs

Date: 7/1/07 - 5/31/11
Principal Researchers: Hambidge, M. Location: Ethiopia

Michael Hambidge, MD, ScD, Professor Emeritus, Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is the principal investigator of this project. The first goal of this study is to determine the effects of a daily maternal Zn supplement (early pregnancy – 9 mos post-partum) on maternal cognition and temperament, fetal and infant brain growth, maternal-infant interaction and on cognition and temperament in early-mid infancy.  The effects of three different doses of Zn supplement (0, 10 and 20 mg Zn) will be compared. The second principal goal is to determine the effects of a 3 mg Zn/day supplement for infants aged 6-9 mos, the offspring of each of the maternal intervention groups, on infant cognitive and motor development and on temperament. This project was conducted between July 2007 and May 2011. You may contact Dr. Hambidge at michael.hambidge@ucdenver.edu.

BIRD Past Research Projects

Zinc and maternal-infant brain function in southern Ethiopia: RCTs

Date: 7/1/07 - 5/31/11
Principal Researchers: Hambidge, M. Location: Ethiopia

Michael Hambidge, MD, ScD, Professor Emeritus, Department of Pediatrics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, is the principal investigator of this project. The first goal of this study is to determine the effects of a daily maternal Zn supplement (early pregnancy – 9 mos post-partum) on maternal cognition and temperament, fetal and infant brain growth, maternal-infant interaction and on cognition and temperament in early-mid infancy.  The effects of three different doses of Zn supplement (0, 10 and 20 mg Zn) will be compared. The second principal goal is to determine the effects of a 3 mg Zn/day supplement for infants aged 6-9 mos, the offspring of each of the maternal intervention groups, on infant cognitive and motor development and on temperament. This project was conducted between July 2007 and May 2011. You may contact Dr. Hambidge at michael.hambidge@ucdenver.edu.