BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

WEEP [Waterton Environmental Pavillion] | 2012

Date: 4/20/19
Icon_Waterton-Environmental-Education-Pavilion
Others Involved: Structural Engineer: Julian Lineham, PE, SECB, MICE, CEng Lee Maggert Principal Studio NYL StructuralEngineers Civil Engineer: Chris S. Strawn Jansen Strawn Consulting Engineers, INC Geotechnical Engineer: Scott Myers, PE TerraCon Excavation: Josh Hawkins Zach Hawkins Concrete: David Neighbour Metro Mix, LLC.Roof framing: Tim DeVos Cemco DenverSteel Fabrication Greg and BJ Titchenal Coalesce Design and Fabrication Roofing: Jamie Fredericks Fowler and PethConcrete Finishing Pat Thomas Toma ConstructionLandscape Supply Alameda Wholesale Student Researchers: Caitlin Blythe Nicole Bruechner Michael Bucher Nicole Davis Carrie Hadley Katherine Hawkins Christopher Johnston Robert Kiester Will Koning Milen Milev Rachel Mott Will Murray Gerald Reynolds JD Signom Astrid Vander Faculty Advisor: Rick Sommerfeld

The pavilion, located in Waterton Canyon, serves as an outdoor classroom for environmental groups involved in Bird Banding, Pond Ecology and Wildlife Habitat.

The structure is a pragmatic response to the various constraints of the site. The tilted columns were conceived to triangulate the lateral loads associated with a structure that, by floodplain regulations, were not allowed to have walls. Off the backside of the structure a small cantilever celebrates the release of captured birds back to nature. The roof drains to a central skylight (fondly referred to as the squoculus) to capture rainwater and filter it through vegetation, soil, and rock before returning it to the floodplain.

BIRD Past Research Projects

WEEP [Waterton Environmental Pavillion] | 2012

Date: 4/20/19
Icon_Waterton-Environmental-Education-Pavilion
Others Involved: Structural Engineer: Julian Lineham, PE, SECB, MICE, CEng Lee Maggert Principal Studio NYL StructuralEngineers Civil Engineer: Chris S. Strawn Jansen Strawn Consulting Engineers, INC Geotechnical Engineer: Scott Myers, PE TerraCon Excavation: Josh Hawkins Zach Hawkins Concrete: David Neighbour Metro Mix, LLC.Roof framing: Tim DeVos Cemco DenverSteel Fabrication Greg and BJ Titchenal Coalesce Design and Fabrication Roofing: Jamie Fredericks Fowler and PethConcrete Finishing Pat Thomas Toma ConstructionLandscape Supply Alameda Wholesale Student Researchers: Caitlin Blythe Nicole Bruechner Michael Bucher Nicole Davis Carrie Hadley Katherine Hawkins Christopher Johnston Robert Kiester Will Koning Milen Milev Rachel Mott Will Murray Gerald Reynolds JD Signom Astrid Vander Faculty Advisor: Rick Sommerfeld

The pavilion, located in Waterton Canyon, serves as an outdoor classroom for environmental groups involved in Bird Banding, Pond Ecology and Wildlife Habitat.

The structure is a pragmatic response to the various constraints of the site. The tilted columns were conceived to triangulate the lateral loads associated with a structure that, by floodplain regulations, were not allowed to have walls. Off the backside of the structure a small cantilever celebrates the release of captured birds back to nature. The roof drains to a central skylight (fondly referred to as the squoculus) to capture rainwater and filter it through vegetation, soil, and rock before returning it to the floodplain.