BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Transmission pathways of opisthorchis viverrini

Date: 1/1/17 - 8/31/17
Principal Researchers: Carlton, E. Location: Thailand

Opisthorchis viverrini is a water-borne parasite found in Asia that causes bile duct cancer. People become infected from consuming raw or undercooked fish. We are working to understand the sources of exposure to the parasite. Where do people obtain infected fish and how are the fish habitats contaminated with the parasite? Answers to these questions can inform disease control programming. This research is being conducted in collaboration with investigators at Khon Kaen University in Thailand and the University of California, Berkeley. This project is slated to run until summer 2017, with potential to continue for another year. You can contact Dr. Carlton at elizabeth.carlton@ucdenver.edu.

BIRD Past Research Projects

Transmission pathways of opisthorchis viverrini

Date: 1/1/17 - 8/31/17
Principal Researchers: Carlton, E. Location: Thailand

Opisthorchis viverrini is a water-borne parasite found in Asia that causes bile duct cancer. People become infected from consuming raw or undercooked fish. We are working to understand the sources of exposure to the parasite. Where do people obtain infected fish and how are the fish habitats contaminated with the parasite? Answers to these questions can inform disease control programming. This research is being conducted in collaboration with investigators at Khon Kaen University in Thailand and the University of California, Berkeley. This project is slated to run until summer 2017, with potential to continue for another year. You can contact Dr. Carlton at elizabeth.carlton@ucdenver.edu.