BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Real-Time Analysis of Kinematics during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion

Date: 8/15/18
Principal Researchers: Dr. Cathy Bodine Others Involved: Dr. Morris Huang

Wrist-worn activity trackers have become a common technology used in our everyday life.; Hhowever, they have not yet been adapted to provide feedback to manual wheelchair users to reduce pain and improve efficiency. This is a problem that needs addressing as ~70% of wheelchair users report having experienced upper-limb joint pain as a result of using their manual wheelchair. This project involvesis solving this problem by developing a custom wrist-worn device that monitors propulsion kinematics, such as push patterns, and then uses biomechanics to identify patterns associated with pain. This information, provided real-time to manual wheelchair users, has the ability to provide training and feedback that could help reduce upper-limb pain in manual wheelchair users.

 

BIRD Past Research Projects

Real-Time Analysis of Kinematics during Manual Wheelchair Propulsion

Date: 8/15/18
Principal Researchers: Dr. Cathy Bodine Others Involved: Dr. Morris Huang

Wrist-worn activity trackers have become a common technology used in our everyday life.; Hhowever, they have not yet been adapted to provide feedback to manual wheelchair users to reduce pain and improve efficiency. This is a problem that needs addressing as ~70% of wheelchair users report having experienced upper-limb joint pain as a result of using their manual wheelchair. This project involvesis solving this problem by developing a custom wrist-worn device that monitors propulsion kinematics, such as push patterns, and then uses biomechanics to identify patterns associated with pain. This information, provided real-time to manual wheelchair users, has the ability to provide training and feedback that could help reduce upper-limb pain in manual wheelchair users.