BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Modeling the Vulnerability of Mobile Home Parks to Disaster: A Longitudinal Study of Affordable Housing Loss After Hurricane Michael

Date: 1/1/19
Principal Researchers: Andrew Rumbach; Esther Sullivan; Carrie Makarewicz

Andrew Rumbach and Carrie Makarewicz, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, along with Esther Sullivan, Department of Sociology, have received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the impact of Hurricane Michael on mobile home parks in northern Florida. The research team, which includes several graduate students from the Masters of Urban and Regional Planning program, will map mobile home parks in
the counties most-impacted by Hurricane Michael and track their long-term recovery.

The grant is a supplemental to their ongoing study of mobile home park loss and recovery along the Gulf Coast of Texas after Hurricane Harvey. The research is a collaboration with the Department of Landscape Architecture and Planning at Texas A&M University and funded by the Humans, Disasters and the Built Environment program at NSF.

BIRD Past Research Projects

Modeling the Vulnerability of Mobile Home Parks to Disaster: A Longitudinal Study of Affordable Housing Loss After Hurricane Michael

Date: 1/1/19
Principal Researchers: Andrew Rumbach; Esther Sullivan; Carrie Makarewicz

Andrew Rumbach and Carrie Makarewicz, Department of Urban and Regional Planning, along with Esther Sullivan, Department of Sociology, have received a grant from the National Science Foundation to study the impact of Hurricane Michael on mobile home parks in northern Florida. The research team, which includes several graduate students from the Masters of Urban and Regional Planning program, will map mobile home parks in
the counties most-impacted by Hurricane Michael and track their long-term recovery.

The grant is a supplemental to their ongoing study of mobile home park loss and recovery along the Gulf Coast of Texas after Hurricane Harvey. The research is a collaboration with the Department of Landscape Architecture and Planning at Texas A&M University and funded by the Humans, Disasters and the Built Environment program at NSF.