BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Minimaliteracy

Date: 1/22/18
Minimaliteracy photograph of model section view
Student Researchers: Mitch Deans Faculty Advisor: Juana Gòmez

This is a project located in a gentrified neighborhood, where property values are very high and incomes wealthy. Therefore, this library is designed to teach the philosophy of less is more, and to break the unfulfilling cycle of consumerism. Taking inspiration from the simple, one-room Carnegie library, this project is a celebration of immaterial goods such as community and teamwork.
 
 
 
By creating a single “Great Room” which connects all four floors, utilizing the rooftop space as community gardens, and turning the underutilized Erie St. into a plaza adjacent to a park, this project champions community spaces and the importance of civic participation. The project also uses what would be considered mundane and gritty materials such as concrete, steel, and plywood which are left exposed and placed over more common civic materials like stone and glass curtain walls. This encourages the shedding of status-connoting material possessions and alludes to the building's function.


Minimaliteracy












BIRD Past Research Projects

Minimaliteracy

Date: 1/22/18
Minimaliteracy photograph of model section view
Student Researchers: Mitch Deans Faculty Advisor: Juana Gòmez

This is a project located in a gentrified neighborhood, where property values are very high and incomes wealthy. Therefore, this library is designed to teach the philosophy of less is more, and to break the unfulfilling cycle of consumerism. Taking inspiration from the simple, one-room Carnegie library, this project is a celebration of immaterial goods such as community and teamwork.
 
 
 
By creating a single “Great Room” which connects all four floors, utilizing the rooftop space as community gardens, and turning the underutilized Erie St. into a plaza adjacent to a park, this project champions community spaces and the importance of civic participation. The project also uses what would be considered mundane and gritty materials such as concrete, steel, and plywood which are left exposed and placed over more common civic materials like stone and glass curtain walls. This encourages the shedding of status-connoting material possessions and alludes to the building's function.


Minimaliteracy