BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

La Junta Transit Depot

Date: 4/1/15 - 8/1/15
Screen Shot 2019-08-14 at 2.23.05 PM
Location: La Junta, CO

La Junta is a city made up of about 7000 residents, located in southeastern Colorado at the junction of the Santa Fe Trail and the Arkansas River. It is historically dependent and connected to the train tracks that run along Highway 50 and the river valley, all of which form the northern edge of the city limits.

The current train depot is a mid-century building lacking the scale and functionality needed by Amtrak and BNSF, who operate from the facility, as well as other bus lines that would help strengthen the depot's role as a transit hub. A new building would create the opportunity to incorporate the needs of both Amtrak and the bus lines, while utilizing modern construction techniques that will allow the facility to incorporate sustainability through the use of passive and active solar design and wind cooling. For this project, the CCCD sought to design a facility that reflects the area's historic and contemporary connection with train transport, serving the city and the entire region.

Field Supervisor: Jeff Wood

BIRD Past Research Projects

La Junta Transit Depot

Date: 4/1/15 - 8/1/15
Screen Shot 2019-08-14 at 2.23.05 PM
Location: La Junta, CO

La Junta is a city made up of about 7000 residents, located in southeastern Colorado at the junction of the Santa Fe Trail and the Arkansas River. It is historically dependent and connected to the train tracks that run along Highway 50 and the river valley, all of which form the northern edge of the city limits.

The current train depot is a mid-century building lacking the scale and functionality needed by Amtrak and BNSF, who operate from the facility, as well as other bus lines that would help strengthen the depot's role as a transit hub. A new building would create the opportunity to incorporate the needs of both Amtrak and the bus lines, while utilizing modern construction techniques that will allow the facility to incorporate sustainability through the use of passive and active solar design and wind cooling. For this project, the CCCD sought to design a facility that reflects the area's historic and contemporary connection with train transport, serving the city and the entire region.

Field Supervisor: Jeff Wood