BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Hybrid-Hydrogels Comprising Clickable Decellularized Extracellular Matrix

Date: 7/1/20
Magin_1

Fibrotic disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, account for over one-third of mortalities worldwide. Strong evidence indicates that cell-matrix interactions drive the progression of fibrosis - the formation of scar tissue. Yet it is not clear whether changes in matrix composition or the subsequent alterations in mechanical properties of the tissues are the more potent driver of fibrosis, i.e., the best target for therapeutics.

The Magin Lab in collaboration with Dr. Darcy Wagner at Lund University has invented a method for incorporating proteins from decellularized lung tissues into dynamically tunable hybrid-hydrogels to recreate this remodeling and study it in vitro.

Lab members working on this project:
  • Rukshika Hewawasam, PhD (Bioengineering Postdoctoral Fellow)
  • Pete Serbedzija, PhD (PRA)
Collaborators:
  • Darcy Wagner, PhD, Lund University, Sweden
  • Daniel Weiss, MD, PhD, University of Vermont
  • Kurt Stenmark, MD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Ginger Ferguson, PhD, University of Colorado, Boulder

Funding sources:
      

BIRD Past Research Projects

Hybrid-Hydrogels Comprising Clickable Decellularized Extracellular Matrix

Date: 7/1/20
Magin_1

Fibrotic disorders, including pulmonary fibrosis, account for over one-third of mortalities worldwide. Strong evidence indicates that cell-matrix interactions drive the progression of fibrosis - the formation of scar tissue. Yet it is not clear whether changes in matrix composition or the subsequent alterations in mechanical properties of the tissues are the more potent driver of fibrosis, i.e., the best target for therapeutics.

The Magin Lab in collaboration with Dr. Darcy Wagner at Lund University has invented a method for incorporating proteins from decellularized lung tissues into dynamically tunable hybrid-hydrogels to recreate this remodeling and study it in vitro.

Lab members working on this project:
  • Rukshika Hewawasam, PhD (Bioengineering Postdoctoral Fellow)
  • Pete Serbedzija, PhD (PRA)
Collaborators:
  • Darcy Wagner, PhD, Lund University, Sweden
  • Daniel Weiss, MD, PhD, University of Vermont
  • Kurt Stenmark, MD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
  • Ginger Ferguson, PhD, University of Colorado, Boulder

Funding sources: