BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Historic Preservation and Disaster Recovery

Date: 7/1/19
Principal Researchers: Andrew Rumbach and Douglas Appler (University of Kentucky)

Andrew Rumbach and Douglas Appler (Associate Professor of Historic Preservation at the University of Kentucky) have written a new article on the role of the Main Street Program in post-disaster recovery plans and processes. Through case studies of disasters in Iowa, Colorado and Vermont, they find that the Main Street program has helped preservationists to overcome common barriers in recovery by bringing together diverse stakeholders, leveraging the strengths of pre-disaster networks and relationships, and linking the restoration and protection of historic resources to economic recovery. The paper establishes a new line of inquiry about collaborative governance approaches to historic preservation and disaster management.

The paper will appear in the Fall 2019 issue of the Journal of Preservation Education and Research.

BIRD Past Research Projects

Historic Preservation and Disaster Recovery

Date: 7/1/19
Principal Researchers: Andrew Rumbach and Douglas Appler (University of Kentucky)

Andrew Rumbach and Douglas Appler (Associate Professor of Historic Preservation at the University of Kentucky) have written a new article on the role of the Main Street Program in post-disaster recovery plans and processes. Through case studies of disasters in Iowa, Colorado and Vermont, they find that the Main Street program has helped preservationists to overcome common barriers in recovery by bringing together diverse stakeholders, leveraging the strengths of pre-disaster networks and relationships, and linking the restoration and protection of historic resources to economic recovery. The paper establishes a new line of inquiry about collaborative governance approaches to historic preservation and disaster management.

The paper will appear in the Fall 2019 issue of the Journal of Preservation Education and Research.