BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Dynamic 3D Models of Pulmonary Fibrosis to Facilitate Precision Medicine

Date: 7/1/20
Dynamic 3D models image

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred. Even though pulmonary fibrosis kills more Americans each year than breast cancer, there is still no cure.

The Magin Lab has developed novel biomaterials and cell culture methods to create 3D models of lung tissue in vitro using induced-pluripotent stem cells. These new models will enable us to conduct dynamic biological studies that are not currently possible in traditional models of fibrosis to accelerate our search for a treatment.









Lab members working on this project:
Donald Campbell, MS (Bioengineering PhD Student), Thomas Caracena, BS (Bioengineering MS Student), Rachel Blomberg, PhD (Bioengineering Postdoctoral Fellow), Pete Serbedzija, PhD (PRA)

Collaborators:
Ganna Bilousova, PhD University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Darcy Wagner, PhD, Lund University, Sweden
David Riches, PhD, National Jewish Health
Elizabeth Redente, PhD, National Jewish Health
Christine Vohwinkel, MD, PhD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Bifeng Gao, PhD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus

Funding sources:
 
  

BIRD Past Research Projects

Dynamic 3D Models of Pulmonary Fibrosis to Facilitate Precision Medicine

Date: 7/1/20
Dynamic 3D models image

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive lung disease that occurs when lung tissue becomes damaged and scarred. Even though pulmonary fibrosis kills more Americans each year than breast cancer, there is still no cure.

The Magin Lab has developed novel biomaterials and cell culture methods to create 3D models of lung tissue in vitro using induced-pluripotent stem cells. These new models will enable us to conduct dynamic biological studies that are not currently possible in traditional models of fibrosis to accelerate our search for a treatment.