BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

Downtown Littleton streetscape redesign

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Gabby Masucci and Jon Brancha, Downtown Littleton Streetscape Redesign

Downtown Littleton Streetscape Redesign
Student Researchers:
  Gabby Masucci and Jon Brachna
 
Link to Capstone Poster  
Link to Executive Summary 

In the Spring of 2020, MURP students Jon Brachna and Gabby Masucci worked for the City of Littleton on the Downtown Streetscape redesign project. In anticipation of a Denver Water infrastructure project, Littleton saw the opportunity to reimage the streetscape of Main Street and Alamo Avenue. The objective of the capstone was to maintain the historic character of both streets, while recommending design alternatives that would improve pedestrian and wheelchair safety, accessibility and alternative uses of space. The students proposed one overall streetscape design and a specific improvement for both streets.

BIRD Past Research Projects

Downtown Littleton streetscape redesign

Date: 1/21/20 - 5/15/20
Gabby Masucci and Jon Brancha, Downtown Littleton Streetscape Redesign

Downtown Littleton Streetscape Redesign
Student Researchers:
  Gabby Masucci and Jon Brachna
 
Link to Capstone Poster  
Link to Executive Summary 

In the Spring of 2020, MURP students Jon Brachna and Gabby Masucci worked for the City of Littleton on the Downtown Streetscape redesign project. In anticipation of a Denver Water infrastructure project, Littleton saw the opportunity to reimage the streetscape of Main Street and Alamo Avenue. The objective of the capstone was to maintain the historic character of both streets, while recommending design alternatives that would improve pedestrian and wheelchair safety, accessibility and alternative uses of space. The students proposed one overall streetscape design and a specific improvement for both streets.