BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

3D-Printed Models of Human Pulmonary Vascular Disease

Date: 7/1/20

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a type of high blood pressure that affects your heart and lungs. It is a progressive and incurable vascular disease characterized by remodeling of and narrowing of the blood vessels. Female patients are four times more likely to be diagnosed with PAH than male patients.

Our lab has developed a new class of phototunable biomaterials and 3D bioprinting techniques that allow us to mimic PAH blood vessels in vitro. This advanced platform provides the foundation for models of increasing complexity that reveal novel mechanistic insights into sex-specific disease prevention and intervention.











Lab members working on this project:

Duncan Davis-Hall, MS (Bioengineering PhD Student)
Mikala Mueller, BS (Bioengineering MS Student)

Collaborators:
Adam Feinberg, PhD, Carnegie Mellon University
Kurt Stenmark, MD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Lori Walker, PhD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Steven Lammers, PhD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Keith Neeves, PhD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus
Vitaly Kheyfets, PhD, University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus

Funding sources:

 
           

BIRD Past Research Projects

3D-Printed Models of Human Pulmonary Vascular Disease

Date: 7/1/20

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a type of high blood pressure that affects your heart and lungs. It is a progressive and incurable vascular disease characterized by remodeling of and narrowing of the blood vessels. Female patients are four times more likely to be diagnosed with PAH than male patients.

Our lab has developed a new class of phototunable biomaterials and 3D bioprinting techniques that allow us to mimic PAH blood vessels in vitro. This advanced platform provides the foundation for models of increasing complexity that reveal novel mechanistic insights into sex-specific disease prevention and intervention.