BIRD Current Research Projects

Overview

The building blocks of prosthetics come in many materials, shapes, and sizes. To create lightweight yet sturdy prosthetics, we explore 3D printing in plastic, carbon fiber, steel, and titanium. In addition, we investigate different methods of actuation such as miniature 3D printed gearboxes for fingers and twisted coil polymers. While some of these parts may look like something out of Star Wars, these are more than just computer-generated images. These prosthetics are real and they work for real people.  

1010 Santa Fe

Date: 8/21/17
Architectrural rendering of interior space
Student Researchers: Joel Miller Faculty Advisor: Ranko Ruzic

This project explores the ideas of universal design by producing a variety of spaces for a diverse population. Rather than painting disability with a broad brush, this project approaches ability as a continuum and attempts to create spaces where anyone can thrive. 
 
Located in the heart of the Santa Fe Arts District, this project aims to make possible a new gallery and studio space for a local nonprofit working with young adults with various disabilities. The project combines gallery, studio, offices, retail marketplace, and an event space while trying to maintain the human-scale pedestrian feel of the neighborhood. 
 
The mixed-use building establishes a series of layers that subtly divide public from private, light from dark, and guide program and way-finding needs. Pockets of outdoor space are designed into each experience and are available at every level varying from the public courtyard on the main street to the quiet light wells located at the heart of the building. The screened elevation provides visual continuity and layering, as well as mitigating the harsh western sun and providing passive cooling strategies.

Drawing of program analysis
Architectural rendering of exterior of building
Drawings of plan view
Drawing of elevation view
Photograph of architectural model

BIRD Past Research Projects

1010 Santa Fe

Date: 8/21/17
Architectrural rendering of interior space
Student Researchers: Joel Miller Faculty Advisor: Ranko Ruzic

This project explores the ideas of universal design by producing a variety of spaces for a diverse population. Rather than painting disability with a broad brush, this project approaches ability as a continuum and attempts to create spaces where anyone can thrive. 
 
Located in the heart of the Santa Fe Arts District, this project aims to make possible a new gallery and studio space for a local nonprofit working with young adults with various disabilities. The project combines gallery, studio, offices, retail marketplace, and an event space while trying to maintain the human-scale pedestrian feel of the neighborhood. 
 
The mixed-use building establishes a series of layers that subtly divide public from private, light from dark, and guide program and way-finding needs. Pockets of outdoor space are designed into each experience and are available at every level varying from the public courtyard on the main street to the quiet light wells located at the heart of the building. The screened elevation provides visual continuity and layering, as well as mitigating the harsh western sun and providing passive cooling strategies.

Drawing of program analysis
Architectural rendering of exterior of building
Drawings of plan view
Drawing of elevation view
Photograph of architectural model